Bachelor of Science in Public Health

Public Health specialists develop programs to teach people about conditions affecting individual and community well-being.  The program focuses on the science of preventing disease, prolonging life, and promoting the health of people and communities through organized efforts to educate, develop policy, conduct scientific research and regulate health systems. Public Health professionals promote wellness by assessing and developing recommendations to help people adopt healthy behaviors. Overall employment of Public Health specialists is projected to grow 12 percent from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations.

Begin your public health education and experience from the very first day!  We carefully and intentionally integrate your General Education courses with your major coursework all throughout your degree program, with opportunities to learn, participate, and lead in multiple global rotations as well.  We've deliberately balanced the number and sequencing of your coursework to allow for part-time or full-time employment, also integral to your learning. 

   

NOTE: Prerequisite and elective courses are also offered and will be applied to your degree plan upon review and approval of your program of study.

Students are admitted throughout the year and cohorts begin each May, August and January. Most students are able to complete the program in 3 to 3 1/2 years, depending on the amount of coursework already completed. A student must satisfy the required 120 credits for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Public Health.

A minimum of 25 credits satisfies the residency requirement and includes the following courses:

Recommended Plan of Study for Public Health and General Education Courses 

 YEAR ONE

SEMESTER ONE

HLTH 112 - Introduction to Public Health w/Lab (5 credits):

This course will examine the public health system in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on how public health data is collected; the various roles and responsibilities of public health departments; principles of population health; evidence based public health practice; current public health issues and trends; preventing disease, disability and death; and public health across the lifespan. Topics will address elements of society and culture and how they impact the population health approach. Students should gain an appreciation for public health and develop an understanding of various public health career options.

HLTH 115 Introduction to Epidemiology I w/ Lab (5 credits):

This course is an introduction to epidemiological concepts and methods used to evaluate the distribution and determinants of health and disease in populations. Intended topics include measures of disease occurrence, common sources and types of data, important study designs and sources of error in epidemiological studies, and epidemiological methods.

ENGL 111: English Composition I (3 credits): 

Provides introduction to the writing process, emphasizing development of fluency in writing and competence in structural and grammatical patterns of written English. Prerequisite: Requires ability to express ideas clearly in writing.

Semester One Total: 13 credits

YEAR ONE
SEMESTER TWO
HLTH 121 - Public Health in Underserved Populations w/Lab (5 credits):

This course is designed to provide students with theoretical foundations, methods, and skills essential to professional community health education practice in minority populations. Through field observations, students determine the ways in which health providers, community leaders, and community residents view health problems in underserved communities, and compare these views with more objective data as a means to develop health intervention strategies.

Prerequisite: HLTH 112

HLTH 125 Environment of Health w/ Lab (5 credits):

Continues study of public health concepts and builds on fundamentals of course surveys theoretical and applied dimensions of communication issues pertaining to environmental, health, and science issues facing contemporary society. Students will learn about the symbolic and material dimensions of environment and health issues, ways in which risk is evaluated and communicated in a variety of contexts, and about the parameters of scientific argument in various technical and political arenas.

Prerequisite: HLTH 115

ENGL 121: English Composition II (3 credits): 

Builds upon the application of writing process skill, emphasizing advanced fluency in writing and competence in structural and grammatical patterns of written English.

Prerequisite: ENGL 111

Semester Two Total: 13 credits

YEAR ONE
SEMESTER THREE

HLTH 201 Global Health Policy  w/Lab (4 credits) :

This course will give a provide an overview of domestic health policy in the United States and international trends  as well as the politics that contribute the development of health policy outcomes. As such, it will combine public policy and political science approaches. The course will begin with a review of the institutions involved crafting health policy (e.g., Congress, state government, the courts, and the bureaucracy) and their roles in the policymaking process. Case studies such as Medicare, Medicaid, and the Patient Protection and the Affordable Care Act will be discussed. In addition to understanding the institutions and policy process, the course will also engage public opinion, elections, and interest group activity. Students investigate the formation of health care policy preferences, exploring data from national and international surveys, as well as assess efforts to mobilize health politics in global contexts.

HUMA 201 Global Humanities in Health (3 credits):

This introductory humanities course allows candidates to practice essential writing, communication, and critical thinking skills necessary to engage in civic and professional interactions as mature, informed adults. Whether through studying literature, visual and performing arts, or philosophy, all humanities courses stress the need to form reasoned, analytical, and articulate responses to cultural and creative works. Studying a wide variety of creative works allows candidates to more effectively enter the global community with a broad and enlightened perspective.

HLTH 136 Public Health Practicum I (5 credits):

This course is designed to apply clinical skills, leadership, and professionalism expected of a professional in a field-based experience through a 10-day, international practicum experience. The focus of this course is advocacy and critical assessment and evaluation of needs on the personal, client, community, and global level. Emphasizes clinical judgment, patient-centered care and collaboration through collaboration with an international agency and project deliverable and related presentation. Associated travel expenses, passport, and US or international travel required.

Semester Three Total: 12 credits

YEAR TWO
SEMESTER ONE

HLTH 214 - Public Health Program Planning (3 credits):

This course provides students with the skills to plan, implement and evaluate evidenced-based public health programs in order to address the most important health issues affecting communities. Students will be provided with the skills to conduct needs assessments, develop goals and objectives, administer programs and conduct evaluation.

ALGB 127 - Applied Algebra (3 credits):

Presents elementary concepts of algebra, linear graphing, literacy, descriptive statistics, and measurement & geometry. This course integrates algebraic principles and application specific to the public health care delivery paradigm.

HLTH 216 - Health Equity w/Lab (5 credits):

This course uses a competency based conceptual framework to provide students with the opportunity to examine the interplay between vulnerability, health status, and health care access and quality. Physical, psychological, demographic, environmental, socioeconomic, and cultural issues influencing the health status of and health care delivery to vulnerable populations are examined. Students will develop essential skills needed to work effectively as members of inter-professional teams and explore ways to improve the quality of health care delivery and health outcomes for vulnerable and marginalized groups.

SOCI 116: Applied Sociology in Global Healthcare (3 credits):

This course explores global social processes and structures applied to the healthcare industry. Topics covered vary each semester, but may include: community, populations, socialization, suburbanization and housing, diversity, economic and global inequality, families and relationships, education, religion, and globalization.

Semester Four Total: 14 credits

YEAR TWO

SEMESTER TWO

HLTH 221: Global Health w/Lab (5 credits):

This course is an introduction to global health and global health systems. The student will examine the impact of cultural, economic and political factors on health and health care in other countries. The focus on health disparities, the global burden of disease, access to care, social justice, and health as a human right will be explored. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals will guide the students learning about a variety of global health issues.

HLTH 222 - Research Methods w/Lab (5 credits):

Students will learn skills that are the foundation of evidence-based practice. These skills include identifying major study design approaches, formulating research questions that align with specific study designs, and interpreting the most common statistical methods used in clinical and population health research. Students will also learn about ethical research conduct and about community engagement to build trust with research participants and strengthen research equity and impact. Through inter-professional collaboration, students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed research articles, how to navigate through the different sections of a research article, summarize its key elements, and critically appraise its strengths and weaknesses. Students will also learn how evidence-based practice guidelines are derived from systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Prerequisite: HLTH 216

IDPT 201 Independent Study (3 credits):

Independent study credits can help you individualize your program of study so you can delve more deeply into an area of interest. You get to work closely with a professional mentor to essentially create and complete a course that is tailored for you. Different course numbers are used depending on the type of work you are doing.

Semester Five Total: 13 credits

YEAR TWO

SEMESTER THREE

HLTH 223: Public Health Education w/Lab (5 credits):

This course will provide an opportunity to study, develop and use different materials and equipment in teaching essentials of public health. Various methods of teaching health will be practiced and evaluated. Candidates will be able to gain classroom and field experience (service-learning) in planning lessons and presentations.

Prerequisite: HLTH 216

HLTH 231 - Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health w/Lab (5 credits):

Students will be introduced to major social and behavioral science theories which inform and influence the health and wellness of individuals, groups, and populations. The importance of evidence-based community and public health programs will be discussed, and students will have an opportunity to apply theories to public health practice and interventions.

Prerequisite: HLTH 221

HLTH 236 Public Health Practicum  II (5 credits):

This course is designed to apply clinical skills, leadership, and professionalism expected of a professional in a field-based experience through a 10-day, international practicum experience. The focus of this course is advocacy and critical assessment and evaluation of needs on the personal, client, community, and global level. Emphasizes clinical judgment, patient-centered care and collaboration through collaboration with an international agency and project deliverable and related presentation. Associated travel expenses, passport, and US or international travel required.

Prerequisite: HLTH 136. 

Semester Six Total: 15 credits

YEAR THREE

SEMESTER ONE

 

HLTH 323 - Public Health Evidence Based Practice w/Lab (5 credits):

This course will include an orientation to the US public health system, current concepts and issues, and major contemporary public health problems. A second content theme will include a brief overview of the development of the quality improvement movement in medicine, resulting in the evidence-based public health movement. These two segments will be integrated as students learn to apply the principles of an evidence-based approach to current, local public health problems. A seminar style of teaching, employing small-group discussion of cases will be employed.

Prerequisite: HLTH 222

HLTH 312 Public Health Interventions and Outcomes (4 credits):

This course is designed for the student to describe use of assessment strategies to detect patient health needs, apply chronic care model to enhance patient and family self-management of a chronic illness, discuss the process used to propose changes in  interventions for patients and their families, and identify selected patient healthcare outcomes.

HLTH 313 Theoretical Basis for Care (3 credits):

This course provides an introduction to evidence-based practice and community health research. Students will focus on the practical skills required to identify and appraise the best evidence to support practice. 

HLTH 314 - Community Health Project (3 credits):

Focuses on care of diverse individuals and families integrating community and population health concepts. Emphasizes community-centered and population-based research with a project deliverable and related presentation.  

Semester Seven Total: 15 credits

YEAR THREE

SEMESTER TWO

HLTH 322 Ministry in Healthcare (3 credits):

This course will focus on health promotion across the lifespan utilizing epidemiological principles with a uniquely spiritual perspective. Students will identify interventions to support health promotion for individuals, families and/or selected age groups through the lens of faith-based care.

HLTH 331 Capstone (4 credits):

Provides students with the opportunity to comprehensively apply and integrate learned concepts from previous courses into a capstone experience. Emphasizes the mastery of patient- centered care, safety, professional judgment, professional behaviors, health informatics, quality improvement, and collaboration in the achievement of optimal outcomes of care. 

(Pre-requisites: HLTH 314)

AIHC 245 - Applied Informatics in Healthcare (3 credits):

Focuses on the application of technology concepts through clinical skill development. Includes principles of healthcare informatics using safety, evidence-based practice, and computational skills. Prepares students to further apply competency in specific skills and drug dosage calculation including the integration of skills in the care of clients in simulated settings.

IDPT 201 Independent Study  (3 credits):

Independent study credits can help you individualize your program of study so you can delve more deeply into an area of interest. You get to work closely with a professional mentor to essentially create and complete a course that is tailored for you. Different course numbers are used depending on the type of work you are doing, and the number of credits varies.

Semester Eight Total: 13 credits

YEAR THREE

SEMESTER THREE

HLTH 311 Spiritual Dimensions of  Public Health Leadership (4 credits):

This course is designed to develop the leadership, management, and professionalism expected of a student a bachelor's level education with a theological perspective. This course explores the complex internal and external forces that affect health. 

STAT 201: Healthcare Statistics (3 credits)

This course builds upon an understanding of research methods and quantitative analysis. Concepts of population health, epidemiology, and evidence-based practices provide the foundation for understanding the importance of data for informing community and population healthcare organizational decisions.

HLTH 336 Public Health Practicum  III (5 credits):

This course is designed to apply clinical skills, leadership, and professionalism expected of a professional in a field-based experience through a 10-day, international practicum experience. The focus of this course is advocacy and critical assessment and evaluation of needs on the personal, client, community, and global level. Emphasizes clinical judgment, patient-centered care and collaboration through collaboration with an international agency and project deliverable and related presentation. Associated travel expenses, passport, and US or international travel required.

(Prerequisite: HLTH 236) 

Semester  Nine Total:  12 credits

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Total Bachelor of Science Degree in Public Health (with required General Education): 120 credits